Performance on Film

    Thursday, February 23, 2006 to Saturday, March 25, 2006

    Opening
    • Friday, February 24, 2006
    “THE DAMNED IN 3D” (45 minutes) screens only on: Thursday, February 23: 9pm, Artist in Attendance Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays: 12pm and 4pm, and Saturdays: 11am, 2pm and 4pm Admission is free and open to the public David Yonge graduated from Emily Carr Institute, Vancouver in 2002. A year earlier, his seminal performance Yellow Diablo vs. 1980 Camaro, had provided him and his audiences with an insight into the potential for Yonge to blur disciplinary lines, and to defy. * An accomplished performance artist, David Yonge’s performances originate from everyday experiences of his own that trigger an intuitive process of development into complex analyses and propositions. His works address key issues of inner struggle, contemporary anxieties and an unusual articulation of class identity. Intense, physical and emotional, Yonge’s performances touch on our feelings, anxieties and fears. Our engagement is one of active participation, whether amused, insulted or angered. The use of masks and specific environments for each performance helps viewers to be invested in the moment of the performance, connecting to the narrative and to the emotions evoked by Yonge’s intuition and careful performative decisions. For Performance on Film, Yonge presents a selection of four performance works spanning the years 2001 to 2005. Not necessarily presented as a retrospective, the sequencing of the works one after another allows for a growing understanding of the multilayers inherent in the performances. His works articulate an overwhelming frustration, while they reflect subtly on class identity issues, interlocking themes of masculinity, gender, race, anxiety, violence, and spectacle. Moreover, the success of the works lies in their functioning to blur the source of our anxieties; the uneasiness felt when experiencing his performances is an effective measure of our involvement. The performances are complicated further by the fact that they are presented on film. Whether in documentation format or as stylized feature, our encounter with the performances is time-based and immediate. Perhaps the most highly developed union of performance and film is The Damned in 3D where the three-dimensionality feature of the film works to create for the viewer a performative experience as opposed to a cinematic one. The large-projection exhibition at Gallery 101 presents Yellow Diablo vs. 1980 Camaro, hHead, Redneck/Redneck, and The Damned in 3-D. Yellow Diablo vs. 1980 Camaro (2001), 14 minutes. Completing a series of his previous wrestling matches with kitchen sinks, televisions and washing machines, this fight against a 1980 Camaro pits Yonge against an ultimate contender. hHead (2002), 35 minutes. A carpenter, a mask and a shelter. A moving performance on impossibility and frustration. Redneck/Redneck (2004), 9 minutes. Based on the urban legend that everyone has an identical twin; legend claims that if the two ever meet; only one can survive. Two bearded, feral Yonges chase each other with a rifle through a coastal BC forest. The Damned in 3D (2005), 45 minutes. A silent 3D film, set in 19th century Vancouver. A solitary man sets out to find and destroy the beast that lies within. Text by Jessie Lacayo, Curator *www.davidyonge.com